Enjoy Training Everyday…? Then Do It

Here is a short post for you. I've posted up a couple excellent video clips by some incredibly strong and knowledgable coaches. First off is Layne Norton's new video blog on overtraining. Layne Norton is jacked as hell and natural. Here are a couple of the highlights: - Cortisol in the short term, is not catabolic, it's indicative of an effective workout - Overtraining in the short term will give you gains, as long as you provide yourself with enough rest Here is an excellent video with John Broz. For those of you who don't know who John Broz is, he's an olympic weightlifting coach in Nevada. His athletes are ridiculously strong and train up 13x per week. They max out on squats everyday, as well as olympic lifts. There…
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'Clean Eating' Defined?

Clean eating is a term that I feel may have lost some momentum as of late. However, I still here the term being thrown around way too often and it's annoying to say the least. I've thought about it long and hard and still can't really create my own definition of 'clean eating.' This post will briefly cover a bunch of stuff, ranging from calories, to hormones, to psychological issues. If you've gotten a chance to peruse my blog, you know that I am a 'calorie is a calorie' guy. I'm aware there are a ton of exceptions to this, but generally speaking I believe, and research supports, that eating a caloric deficit, regardless of macronutrient composition, is a surefire way to lose weight. Notice how I didn't say lose…
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'Muscle, Smoke & Mirrors: Volume I' Reviewed

I can't recall how I heard about this book. I came upon it on Amazon and read a couple of the excellent reviews. Since I've started researching more and more information about training methods that were utilized decades ago, I thought this book would be very interesting. Let me tell you this book did not disappoint. I was at first expecting a book that would cover some of the strength training routines of some of the strongest guys ever in the 40's, 50's and onwards. This book did not deliver these. If you really want to find more information about training routines I suggest you check out this site, it is completely awesome, and a great way to spend hours learning cool shit. At first I was a little bit…
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A Couple of Strength Routines: Part II

In Part I, I covered Ladders. The second part will cover the Hepburn Power routines. [caption id="attachment_818" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Doug Hepburn overhead pressing what appears to be 315 pounds..."][/caption] I first read about this routine on Matt Perryman's blog. Just so you know Doub Hepburn was the first individual to bench 500 pounds. According to Sean Katterle, he got his bench all the way up to 580 pounds. This was was in the 50's when there was no supportive gear and little to no drugs being used in North America. Very impressive stuff. This routine will again have you handling the same weight for multiple singles, this is known as the Hepburn A routine. Once this goes stale you move to the Hepburn B routine. You start with a weight…
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A Couple of Strength Routines: Part I

There are a crap load of strength routines out there. There are many that tend to hide in the shadows, not really gaining in popularity. Why is this? Maybe because they aren't sexy, or they're incredibly hard, or maybe some people would find them boring and monotonous. For me, and for many other individuals, getting stronger matters, and the way you achieve this strength doesn't matter... Just do something in the gym, crazy or not, and if it puts pounds on the bar people will use these routines. I'm going to present two routines that I have been using on a variety of lifts. Part I will cover Ladders. Part II will cover the Hepburn A and B routines. These routines aren't a pure program, it's a specific method to…
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Screening and Assessing… Why?

Many of my clients ask me what the reason is for my initial screen and assessment during our first training session together. In my opinion it's negligent for me not to screen and assess a client. This article will go over the reasons that anyone who is looking for a personal trainer should be screened and assessed. I've talked at length about the Functional Movement Screen in previous posts. I'm not here to promote the system although I have yet to find anything better. As Charlie Weingroff told me during his seminar, you should have some sort of objective movement baseline to compare your movement patterns to. You also should not be exercising in pain! Whether or not you use the FMS or not is moot. Just do something that…
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Pushing Training Frequency and Recovery Part II

Part I of this series mainly covered my reasons for an increase in squatting. This part will cover the rest of my training. Enjoy. I'm deadlifting 2 times per week. Going pretty light on one day doing sumo deadlifts as fast as I can for multiple singles one day and the other day working my way up to a nice and heavy single. I'm lucky in the way that deadlifting doesn't give me crazy muscle soreness. For instance Jamie Lewis who is an absolute beast doesn't squat often because it leaves him a sore wreck for days after. If I still deadlifted with a conventional stance, I'd be sore as hell for days after as well. Sumo doesn't make me sore, therefore I deadlift often. Heck, last week I did…
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Pushing Training Frequency and Recovery Part I

I'm going to get part II of my piece on Carbohydrates up next week. For this week I just want to cover a few things I've been tinkering with on the training front that have been a complete opposite to the methods I've used for pretty much the entirety of my weight training career. I've had a few clients and other people ask me what my training looks like, so here it is. I will go over training frequency and recovery. **After writing this, I realized it was way too long. So I'll be releasing it in two parts.** I've been training 6-9x per week over the past month. It's been an excellent experience and it's highly unlikely that I'll go back to what I was doing before (unless time…
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Are Diets High In Carbohydrates Making You Fat? Part I

[caption id="attachment_787" align="alignleft" width="300"] Are these to blame for your current waistline?[/caption] I wanted to cover a few examples of diets differing in carbohydrate composition on our body composition and bio markers of health. Part I will go over a few diets that are high in carbohydrates, and we'll examine what these diets had on body composition and blood work. Part II will cover a few misconceptions that may be leading individuals to believe that carbohydrate are the evil carbohydrate that is causing the obesity epidemic. Is it even possible to be lean, or to even lose weight on a high carbohydrate diet? These questions will be answered. Let's first look at the Okinawan diet. This diet was composed of 85% carbohydrate, 9% protein and 6% fat. "Wow these people…
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My Current Vision of Abdominal Training

This post was inspired fully by Mike Robertson's awesome article published a few weeks ago titled: Should We Train The Rectus Abdominus. I strongly recommend you click on that link above and read that article. Mike Robertson has been a huge influence on me and when he says something crazy, there is usually something behind it. In his article above he discusses a couple of the finer points of the neutral spine. I too have been using the chest-up cue for the entire time I've been training clients. It's a simple cue to help people understand how to keep their thoracic spine extended rather than flexed during various exercises. As a matter of fact, I cue neutral spine for pretty much ALL free weight exercises. I'm fully aware that there…
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